T. vaginalis in riverside women in Amazonia, Brazil: an experience using the EVALYN® BRUSH vaginal self-collection device

  • Danielle AP Rocha Instituto de Saúde e Biotecnologia (ISB), Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Coari, Amazonas, Brasil
  • Maria Joana N Azevedo Instituto de Saúde e Biotecnologia (ISB), Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Coari, Amazonas, Brasil
  • Sávio José S Batista Instituto de Saúde e Biotecnologia (ISB), Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Coari, Amazonas, Brasil
  • Êmille S Beltrão Instituto de Saúde e Biotecnologia (ISB), Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Coari, Amazonas, Brasil
  • Cássia O Moraes Instituto de Saúde e Biotecnologia (ISB), Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Coari, Amazonas, Brasil
  • Adriene F Araújo Instituto de Saúde e Biotecnologia (ISB), Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Coari, Amazonas, Brasil
  • Renato S Reis Instituto de Saúde e Biotecnologia (ISB), Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Coari, Amazonas, Brasil
  • Kátia L Torres Fundação Centro de Controle em Oncologia do Estado do Amazonas (FCECON), Manaus, Amazonas, Brasil
  • José E Levi Instituto de Medicina Tropical (IMT), Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, São Paulo, Brasil
  • Josiane M Mariño Instituto de Saúde e Biotecnologia (ISB), Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Coari, Amazonas, Brasil
Keywords: Self-collection, Trichomonas vaginalis, Amazonas

Abstract

Introduction: The challenges related to the diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections present more complex factors in remote and hard-to-reach areas. The use of self-collection devices that facilitate the obtaining of a biological sample with high quality for sensitive molecular tests have been examined. This study aimed to evaluate the performance and acceptance of the Evalyn® Brush (Rovers® Medical Devices) for detection of T. vaginalis among women living in the riverside communities of Amazonas, Brazil.

Methodology: The study included 300 riverside women. They received instructions for self-collection, carried out the task, and then answered a questionnaire on the use of the device. T. vaginalis was detected by Polymerase Chain Reaction, using primers TVK3/TVK7.

Results: The mean age of the women was 35.8 years, and most of them presented low schooling, low income, agricultural activity and lived in a marital union. All samples were positive for human genomic DNA (100%) and the prevalence of T. vaginalis infection was 5.6% (n = 17). Of the 300 women, 293 (97.7%) indicated that they liked the use of the device, 287 (95.7%) reported having had no difficulty in handling it, 265 (88.3%) did not feel any type of discomfort and 228 (76%) said they preferred the self-collection to the collection made by the professional, mainly due to privacy and comfort.

Conclusions: The Evalyn® Brush proved reliable as a device for the collection of biological samples for molecular analysis and was well-accepted by women. Its use can be indicated in remote and hard to reach places.

Published
2019-11-30
How to Cite
1.
Rocha DA, Azevedo MJN, Batista SJS, Beltrão Êmille S, Moraes CO, Araújo AF, Reis RS, Torres KL, Levi JE, Mariño JM (2019) T. vaginalis in riverside women in Amazonia, Brazil: an experience using the EVALYN® BRUSH vaginal self-collection device. J Infect Dev Ctries 13:1029-1037. doi: 10.3855/jidc.11385
Section
Original Articles