Schistosomiasis among pregnant women in Njombe-Penja health district, Cameroon

  • Calvin Tonga Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Littoral region, Cameroon
  • Charlie Ngo Bayoi Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Littoral region, Cameroon
  • Flore Chanceline Tchanga Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, West region, Cameroon
  • Jacqueline Félicité Yengue Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, Yaoundé, Centre region, Cameroon
  • Godlove Bunda Wepnje Faculty of Science, University of Buea, Buea, South-West region, Cameroon
  • Hervé Nyabeyeu Nyabeyeu Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Littoral region, Cameroon
  • Lafortune Kangam Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, Yaoundé, Centre region, Cameroon
  • Larissa Nono Kouodjip Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, Yaoundé, Centre region, Cameroon
  • Patrick Ntonga Akono Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Littoral region, Cameroon
  • Léopold Gustave Lehman Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Littoral region, Cameroon
Keywords: Schistosomiasis, Pregnancy, Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma guineensis, Schistosoma mansoni, Njombe, Penja, anaemia

Abstract

Introduction: Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease with endemic foci in Cameroon. Epidemiological data on schistosomiasis in pregnancy are scarce in the country. This study describes the prevalence, diversity and factors associated with schistosomiasis in pregnant women in Njombe-Penja where schistosomiasis was first reported in 1968.

Methodology: Two hundred and eighty-two (282) pregnant women were enrolled at first antenatal consultation between April and December 2016. A questionnaire was used to document socio-economic and obstetric information. Stool and terminal urine samples were collected and analysed using Kato-Katz/Formol-Ether concentration techniques and centrifugation methods respectively. Haemoglobin concentration was measured from finger prick blood, using an URIT®-12 electronic haemoglobinometer. Bivariate and logistic regression were used for statistical analyses with Epi-Info version 7.2.1.0. Statistical significance level was set at 0.05.

Results: The overall prevalence of schistosomiasis was 31.91%. Schistosoma guineensis, S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections were found in 0.35% (n = 1), 4.96% (n = 14) and 28.01% (n = 79) of participants, respectively. Co-infection with two species of Schistosoma was found in 4.44% of these women. The prevalence of this disease was significantly higher in younger women (≤ 20 years old) and among residents of Njombe. All S. haematobium infected women were anemic and infection was associated with significantly lower haemoglobin levels (p = 0.02).

Conclusion: The prevalence of schistosomiasis is high among pregnant women in Njombe-Penja, with some adverse effects on blood levels. Three Schistosoma species were found. Female of childbearing age should be considered for mass drug administration.

Author Biographies

Charlie Ngo Bayoi, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Littoral region, Cameroon

PhD student

Flore Chanceline Tchanga, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang, West region, Cameroon

MSc student

Jacqueline Félicité Yengue, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, Yaoundé, Centre region, Cameroon

PhD student

Godlove Bunda Wepnje, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, Buea, South-West region, Cameroon

PhD student

Hervé Nyabeyeu Nyabeyeu, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Littoral region, Cameroon

PhD student

Lafortune Kangam, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, Yaoundé, Centre region, Cameroon

PhD student

Larissa Nono Kouodjip, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, Yaoundé, Centre region, Cameroon

PhD student

Patrick Ntonga Akono, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Littoral region, Cameroon

Associate Professor of Biology

Léopold Gustave Lehman, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Littoral region, Cameroon

Associate Professor of Biology

Published
2019-12-31
How to Cite
1.
Tonga C, Ngo Bayoi C, Tchanga FC, Yengue JF, Wepnje GB, Nyabeyeu Nyabeyeu H, Kangam L, Koudjip Nono L, Akono Ntonga P, Lehman LG (2019) Schistosomiasis among pregnant women in Njombe-Penja health district, Cameroon. J Infect Dev Ctries 13:1150-1158. doi: 10.3855/jidc.11767
Section
Original Articles