Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA infections in a Saudi Arabian Hospital: a 10-year surveillance study

  • Arif Mansour Al-Hamad Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia
  • Afaq Ali Alfaraj Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia
  • Jaffar Altowaileb Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia
  • Sameer Mahdi Al-Shamlan Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia
  • Hussam Leskafi Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia
  • Fatimah Abdullah Alsubeikhy Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia
  • Hussein Radhi Abbas Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia
Keywords: MRSA, antibiotic resistance, susceptibility, WHONET

Abstract

Introduction: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections remain prevalent and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present study was to investigate the epidemiology of MRSA infections and antibiotic susceptibility in Qatif, Saudi Arabia.

Methodology: All patients who had positive culture for S. aureus from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2015 were enrolled and analyzed in WHONET, a free database software developed by the World Health Organization (WHO). Patients’ data were collected from electronic medical records and traditional chart reviews to determine whether MRSA acquisition was likely to have been in the community or in the healthcare facility. Susceptibility results for community-associated (CA)-MRSA were compared with isolates from healthcare setting.

Results: A total of 3395 patients with S. aureus infections were analyzed, with an overall annual MRSA incidence of 25 cases per 100,000 patients (27% of total S. aureus isolates). While the majority (64%) of MRSA infections occurred in healthcare setting, CA-MRSA isolation increased steadily from 23% in 2006 to 60% in 2015, exceeding rate of isolation of healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA. Skin and soft tissue, the lung and blood stream were the most common sites of infection, with 20% to 35% of MRSA infections occurring in pediatric patients. In the inpatient setting, the majority of infections due to MRSA were in surgical wards and critical care units. Compared with CA-MRSA, HA-MRSA isolates turned out to be more frequently resistant against ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole.

Conclusions: Staphylococcus aureus continues to cause multiple site infections with a relatively stable methicillin-resistance rate, but the isolation of MRSA from the community is increasing.

Author Biographies

Arif Mansour Al-Hamad, Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia

Division of Clinical Microbiology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Afaq Ali Alfaraj, Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia

Division of Clinical Microbiology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Jaffar Altowaileb, Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia

Division of Clinical Microbiology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Sameer Mahdi Al-Shamlan, Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia

Division of Clinical Microbiology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Hussam Leskafi, Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia

Division of Clinical Microbiology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Fatimah Abdullah Alsubeikhy, Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia

Division of Clinical Microbiology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Hussein Radhi Abbas, Qatif Central Hospital, Qatif, Saudi Arabia

Division of Clinical Microbiology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

Published
2018-06-30
How to Cite
1.
Al-Hamad A, Alfaraj A, Altowaileb J, Al-Shamlan S, Leskafi H, Alsubeikhy F, Abbas H (2018) Incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA infections in a Saudi Arabian Hospital: a 10-year surveillance study. J Infect Dev Ctries 12:454-461. doi: https://doi.org/10.3855/jidc.9778
Section
Original Articles