Negative immunomodulation by parasitic infections in the human response to vaccines

  • Catalina Alvarez-Larrotta Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia
  • Eliana María Arango Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia
  • Jaime Carmona-Fonseca Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia
Keywords: parasites, vaccines, immunomodulation, Plasmodium, helminths

Abstract

Parasitic infections are an important cause of global morbidity and mortality and are highly prevalent in "underdeveloped" countries. The presence of parasitic infections is associated with modulation of the immune system and changes in the response to bacterial and viral vaccines. The objective of this review was to compile, summarize and analyze information about immunomodulation by parasitic infections and its effects on the immune response to vaccines. We also identified the parasites most associated with immunomodulation of vaccine responses and those vaccines most affected. In addition, articles evaluating the effect of chemoprophylaxis for malaria on the immune response against vaccines were considered. The most affected vaccines are Bacillus Calmette-Guérin and bacterial polysaccharide vaccines. Malaria is the infection most associated with decreased response to vaccines; however, there are discordant results. Chemoprophylaxis for malaria did not change the immune response to vaccination. While parasitic infections can alter the immune response to vaccination, it is important to clarify the discrepancies and establish the mechanisms.

Published
2018-10-31
How to Cite
1.
Alvarez-Larrotta C, Arango E, Carmona-Fonseca J (2018) Negative immunomodulation by parasitic infections in the human response to vaccines. J Infect Dev Ctries 12:812-823. doi: https://doi.org/10.3855/jidc.10337
Section
Reviews