The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries (JIDC) has been launched during spring 2007 and has already received and processed a huge number of manuscripts. Many of the articles we receive are sent directly for peer review. Others require pre-review mentoring, a unique service that JIDC is committed to provide in order to overcome some of the documented biases against developing country science (Horton 2003). The JIDC editors would like to emphasize our stance on the following important aspects of publication ethics in the face of having received a few articles in violation.

Articles that violate the ethical norms of scientific publishing have so far been very few and have come from well-meaning scientists who are unfamiliar with publishing etiquette and ethics. However even unintentional misrepresentations, duplications and other violations can be viewed as misconduct, and are therefore harmful to journal and author reputation. Below we summarize some of the more common violations associated with scientific publication as a guide for prospective authors, reviewers and editors. The JIDC editorial and mentorship offices are also happy to address any pre-submission questions on publication ethics.