Clinical features and treatment outcomes of visceral leishmaniasis patients admitted to three centers in Oromia, Ethiopia

  • Samson Tekalign KalaCORE Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Cherinet Adera KalaCORE Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Margriet den Boer KalaCORE-UKaid and MSF, Geneva, Switzerland
  • Hirpha Miecha Oromia Regional Health Bureau, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Ashenafi Zewde AJJDC/NALA Foundation, seconded to Oromia RHB, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Dagnachew Mulugeta World Health Organization, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Tesfahun Bishawu Federal Ministry of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Weyuma Birru Negelle General Hospital, Negelle Town, Oromia region, Ethiopia
  • Awoke Lema Yabello General Hospital, Yabello Town, Oromia region, Ethiopia
  • Tilahun Sahlu Ginnir General Hospital, Ginnir Town, Oromia region, Ethiopia
  • Fabiana Alves Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), Geneva, Switzerland
  • Marcel Manzi Medecins Sans Frontieres, Medical department (Operational research), Brussels Operational Centre, Luxembourg
  • Kudakwashe Takarinda KalaCORE-UKaid and MSF, Geneva, Switzerland
  • Johan van Griensven KalaCORE Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Keywords: Visceral leishmaniasis, treatment, Ethiopia

Abstract

Introduction: In three health care facilities in the Oromia region, the aim of this study is to report on 1) the number of VL cases registered over time (2013-2018) and 2) the clinical profile, type of treatment used and response to treatment.

Methodology: A retrospective cohort study was conducted among all VL cases admitted with a diagnosis of VL.

Results: A total of 434 VL cases were registered at the three health facilities, but patient files were available for only 188. Most (51.6%) were children and only three presented with VL relapse. 78 (41.5%) of the 188 patients presented within one month of symptom onset. Concurrent severe acute malnutrition (27.1%), tuberculosis (6.4%) and malaria (6.4%) were common. There were only two cases with HIV coinfection. Fourty-three percent were treated with antimonials, 34% with antimonials combined with paromomycin and 23% with AmBisome. Amongst the 188 patients with patient files there were no deaths and one treatment failure. Six months outcome data were however missing for all. Aggregated data from the 434 VL cases reported three deaths, two treatment failures and one relapse.

Conclusions: Children were most commonly affected, suggesting long-term endemicity. While short-term outcomes are encouraging, long-term follow-up data are required.

Published
2020-06-30
How to Cite
1.
Tekalign S, Adera C, den Boer M, Miecha H, Zewde A, Mulugeta D, Bishawu T, Birru W, Lema A, Sahlu T, Alves F, Manzi M, Takarinda K, van Griensven J (2020) Clinical features and treatment outcomes of visceral leishmaniasis patients admitted to three centers in Oromia, Ethiopia. J Infect Dev Ctries 14:42S-47S. doi: 10.3855/jidc.11731
Section
The Ethiopian SORT IT Course