Invasive bacteria isolates from children with severe infections in a Nigerian hospital

  • Anthony O. Onipede Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital and Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife
  • Adedeji A. Onayade Community Health and Nutrition, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital and Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife
  • Jerome B.E. Elusiyan Department of Paediatrics and Child health, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital and Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife
  • Perpetua O. Obiajunwa Department of Paediatrics and Child health, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital and Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife
  • Ezra O.O. Ogundare Department of Paediatrics and Child health, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital and Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife
  • Olarinde O. Olaniran Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital and Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife
  • Lateef A. Adeyemi Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital and Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife
  • Oyeku O. Oyelami Department of Paediatrics and Child health, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital and Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife
Keywords: bacterial agents, sepsis, meningitis, children, Nigeria

Abstract

Background: Little information is available about the aetiology and epidemiology of serious bacterial infections in Nigeria. This study determined bacterial isolates from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children presenting in the emergency room of a teaching hospital in Nigeria. Method: From October 2005 to December 2006, children aged two to 60 months presenting with signs of acute systemic infections were recruited. Blood culture and CSF specimens were collected and processed using standard microbiological protocols. Data were analysed using SPSS version 11 software. Results: Two hundred and two blood and 69 CSF samples were cultured. Fifty-five (27%) of the blood cultures yielded Gram-negative bacilli and Gram-positive cocci in almost equal proportions. The most common isolates from the blood cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, 26 (12.9%) and atypical coliforms, 13 (6.5%). Others are Klebsiella spp, 3 (1.5%); Klebsiella pneumonia, 2 (1.0%); Escherichia coli, 3 (1.5%); Enterobacter agglomerans, 2 (1.1%); Proteus mirabilis, 2(1%); Pseudomonas spp, 2 (1.0%); Haemophilus influenza, 1 (1.0%); and Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 1 (1.0%). Fourteen out of 67 (20.9%) of the CSF samples yielded bacterial isolates: Streptococcus pneumonia, 3 (4.5%); Haemophilus influenza, 8 (11.9%); Hemophilus spp, 1 (1.5%); E. Coli, 1 (1.5%); and atypical coliform, 1 (1.5%). Gram-negative coliform isolates were predominantly resistant to penicillin based antibiotics and co-trimoxazole but sensitive to third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones. A high percentage of S. aureus isolates were multi-drug resistant. Conclusions: Bacterial infections contribute to the significant morbidity among children in our environment. S. aureus was more frequently isolated in sepsis while H. influenzae appears to play a major role in meningitis. Appropriate use of antibiotics is needed to manage affected children effectively. We also recommend improved vaccine coverage of children under the age of five years.
Published
2009-07-01
How to Cite
1.
Onipede AO, Onayade AA, Elusiyan JB, Obiajunwa PO, Ogundare EO, Olaniran OO, Adeyemi LA, Oyelami OO (2009) Invasive bacteria isolates from children with severe infections in a Nigerian hospital. J Infect Dev Ctries 3:429-436. doi: 10.3855/jidc.413
Section
Original Articles