Prevalence of Campylobacter among goats and retail goat meat in Congo

  • Rosette Kabwang a Mpalang University of Liège, Belgium
  • Raphaël Boreux University of Liège, Belgium
  • Pierrette Melin University of Liège, Belgium
  • Khang'Mate Akir Ni Bitiang University of Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Georges Daube University of Liège, Belgium
  • Patrick De Mol University of Liège, Belgium
Keywords: campylobacter jejuni, campylobacter coli, goat, polymerase chain reaction, prevalence

Abstract

Background: The prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli was determined in goat and goat meat sold at retail outlets in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo).

Methodology: A total of 644 samples, including 177 goat meat, 86 goat stomachs, 139 ready to eat (RTE) goat skewers, and 242 goat faecal samples were examined for the presence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli using polymerase chain reaction.

Results: Overall, Campylobacter spp. were found in 34.6% of the examined samples. C. jejuni was isolated in 10.1% and C. coli in 26.7% of samples. Only 2.2% of all samples were positive for both species. There was a significant association between the prevalence of C. coli and the type of sample (p < 0.05). The overall prevalence of Campylobacter in different sample groups was 41.2%, 37.2%, 23.7%, and 35.1% for goat meat, goat stomachs, RTE goat skewers, and goat faecal samples, respectively. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the prevalence observed in the rainy season (16.7%) and the dry season (20.0%). Moreover, the overall prevalence of Campylobacter in slaughter sites, open-air markets, warehouses, and semi-open-air markets was 28.2%, 34.2%, 35.4%, and 42.9%, respectively. Statistically, there was no influence of the sample collection site on the frequency of isolation of Campylobacter (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: This study shows that, considering the relatively high prevalence of this pathogen, live goat and goat meat are major sources of human and environmental contamination by Campylobacter spp. in Lubumbashi.

Author Biographies

Rosette Kabwang a Mpalang, University of Liège, Belgium

PhD Student at the University of Liège. Department of Medical Microbiology. Faculty of Medicine.

Chef des Travaux-university of Lubumbashi/ Department of Expertise Hygiene and Technology of Food from Animal Origin. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine.

Raphaël Boreux, University of Liège, Belgium

Department of Medical Microbiology

Faculty of Medicine

Pierrette Melin, University of Liège, Belgium

Department of Medical Microbiology

Faculty of Medicine

Khang'Mate Akir Ni Bitiang, University of Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine
Georges Daube, University of Liège, Belgium

Food Science, Department of Microbiology

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

Patrick De Mol, University of Liège, Belgium

Department of Medical Microbiology

Faculty of Medicine

Published
2014-02-13
How to Cite
1.
a Mpalang RK, Boreux R, Melin P, Akir Ni Bitiang K, Daube G, De Mol P (2014) Prevalence of Campylobacter among goats and retail goat meat in Congo. J Infect Dev Ctries 8:168-175. doi: 10.3855/jidc.3199
Section
Original Articles