The clinical management of cesarean section-acquired Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infections

  • Shih-Ming Tsao Institute of Medicine and School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC
  • Keh-Sen Liu Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, St Joseph’s Hospital, Yunlin, Taiwan, ROC
  • Hsien-Hua Liao Institute of Medicine and School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC
  • Tian-Lin Huang Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC.
  • Gwan-Han Shen Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan,ROC.
  • Thomas Chang-Yao Tsao Institute of Medicine and School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC
  • Yuan-Ti Lee Institute of Medicine and School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC
Keywords: surgical site infections, healthcare-associated infection, antimicrobial management, nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, Mycobacterium abscessus, cesarean section

Abstract

Introduction: Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) can cause a broad spectrum of both community and healthcare-associated infections in humans. The aim of this study was to report the clinical management and outcomes of successive patients following cesarean delivery with healthcare-associated surgical site infections (SSIs) caused by RGM.

Methodology: Patients who were admitted to Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, between September 2006 and July 2008, and who developed SSIs following cesarean delivery at an obstetrics hospital and were then referred to our hospital, were enrolled. Demographic characteristics of the patients and clinical isolates were obtained retrospectively and an environmental investigation was performed. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of the hsp65gene and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of large genomic DNA restriction fragments were applied to differentiate Mycobacterium species.

Results: Seventeen patients were diagnosed with RGM infections by microbiology and/or histopathology. Mycobacterial isolates by PCR-RFLP analysis from 15 patients revealed Mycobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus) and M. lentiflavum. Most of the patients received surgical debridement and combination antimicrobial therapy and were eventually cured.

Conclusions: Our study demonstrates the potential that RGM infections have in causing healthcare-associated SSIs. Surgery plus prolonged combination antimicrobial therapy seemed to be an effective option for the management of M. abscessus infections.

Published
2014-02-13
How to Cite
1.
Tsao S-M, Liu K-S, Liao H-H, Huang T-L, Shen G-H, Tsao TC-Y, Lee Y-T (2014) The clinical management of cesarean section-acquired Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infections. J Infect Dev Ctries 8:184-192. doi: 10.3855/jidc.3821
Section
Original Articles