Risk factors of prolonged hospital stay in children with viral severe acute respiratory infections

  • Amani A El Kholy Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
  • Nadia A Mostafa Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
  • Aliaa Adel Ali Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
  • Seham Awad El-Sherbini Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
  • Reem Ibrahim Ismail Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
  • Rania Ismail Magdy Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
  • May Sherif Soliman Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
  • Mayar M. Said Global Disease Detection and Response Program, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No.3, Egypt
Keywords: respiratory viruses, children, SARI, prolonged stay

Abstract

Introduction: Severe acute lower respiratory infections (SARIs) are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in young children, especially in developing countries. The present study focused on detection of risk factors for prolonged hospital stays among children with viral SARIs.

Methodology: A sentinel surveillance study was conducted at Cairo University Hospital (CUH) between February 2010 and May 2011. Nasopharyngeal (NP) and oropharyngeal (OP) swabs were collected from all children admitted with SARIs. Viruses were identified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

Results: Out of 1,046 children, 380 (36%) were positive for one or more viruses; these included respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (22.9%), adenovirus (6.2%), parainfluenza viruses (PIVs1-3) (5.1%), human metapneumovirus (HMPV) (4.5%), influenza A (1.4%), and influenza B (0.6%). Viral etiology was mainly detected in children under one year of age (88.9%). Prolonged length of stay was independently associated with the presence of cyanosis and underlying chronic illness (OR 7.4, CI: 1.8-30.32 [p = 0.005], OR 2.5, CI: 1.36-4.64 [p = 0.004], respectively). Virus type did not affect the length of hospital stay (p > 0.05). Oxygen therapy was required in 91% of the patients. A total of 43 patients (11.6%) required intensive care admission. Twenty-one patients (5.5%) died, and 15 of them (71.4%) had an underlying chronic illness.

Conclusions: The study demonstrated the important burden of respiratory viruses as a cause of SARI in hospitalized children in a tertiary Egyptian hospital. Cyanosis and underlying chronic illness were significantly associated with prolonged length of stay.

Author Biographies

Amani A El Kholy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
MD, Professor, Department of Clinical and Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University.
Nadia A Mostafa, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
MD, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University.
Aliaa Adel Ali, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University.
Seham Awad El-Sherbini, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University.
Reem Ibrahim Ismail, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University.
Rania Ismail Magdy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University.
May Sherif Soliman, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
MD, Lecturer, Department of Clinical and Chemical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University
Mayar M. Said, Global Disease Detection and Response Program, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No.3, Egypt
Ph.D, Head of Molecular Diagnostic Section, Global Disease Detection and Response Program, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit No.3
Published
2014-10-15
How to Cite
1.
El Kholy AA, Mostafa NA, Ali AA, El-Sherbini SA, Ismail RI, Magdy RI, Soliman MS, Said MM (2014) Risk factors of prolonged hospital stay in children with viral severe acute respiratory infections. J Infect Dev Ctries 8:1285-1293. doi: 10.3855/jidc.4682
Section
Original Articles