CXCL14 deficiency does not impact the outcome of influenza or Escherichia coli infections in mice

  • Abubaker ME Sidahmed Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Alberto J Leon Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • David Banner Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Alyson A Kelvin Immune Diagnostics and Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Thomas Rowe Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Ivo Boudakov Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Norbert Degousse Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Barry B Rubin Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • David J Kelvin Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Keywords: CXCL14, BRAK, pneumonia, influenza

Abstract

Introduction: Chemokines are small proteins that regulate different cellular functions, such as leukocyte activation, chemoattraction and inflammation. The chemokine CXCL14 (BRAK) is a highly conserved gene among species and through evolution. It has been shown that CXCL14 is locally upregulated during viral infections, also, it has been found that this chemokine possesses direct antibacterial activities. Nonetheless, the exact role that CXCL14 plays during infection remains elusive.

Methodology: CXCL14 deficient mice were generated in a C57B6/129 background and followed by phenotypic characterization. Later, the effect of CXCL14 deficiency during influenza infection and E. coli challenge was assessed.

Results: Other than a slight weight reduction, CXCL14 deficient mice exhibited no phenotypic alterations. CXCL14 deficiency did not influence the outcome of influenza virus infection or challenge with E. coli, and no statistically significant differences in clinical signs, cellular responses and histopathological findings were observed.

Conclusions: CXCL14 does not seem to play a pivotal role during influenza and E. coli infections of the lung; these results are suggestive of functional overlap between CXCL14 and other chemokines that are present during lung infection.

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Author Biography

Alberto J Leon, Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario
Published
2014-10-15
How to Cite
1.
Sidahmed AM, Leon AJ, Banner D, Kelvin AA, Rowe T, Boudakov I, Degousse N, Rubin BB, Kelvin DJ (2014) CXCL14 deficiency does not impact the outcome of influenza or Escherichia coli infections in mice. J Infect Dev Ctries 8:1301-1306. doi: 10.3855/jidc.3890
Section
Original Articles