Impact of sporadic reporting of poultry Salmonella serovars from selected developing countries

  • Elie K Barbour Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
  • Danielle B Ayyash Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
  • Wafa Alturkistni King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Areej Alyahiby King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Soonham Yaghmoor King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Archana Iyer King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Jehad Yousef King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Taha Kumosani King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Steve Harakeh Special Infectious Agents Unit – Biosafety Level 3, King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Keywords: Developing countries, poultry Salmonella serovars

Abstract

This review documents the sporadic reporting of poultry Salmonella serovars in South Africa, Egypt, Indonesia, India, and Romania, five countries selected based on the importance of their distribution in different regions of the world and their cumulative significant population size of 1.6 billion. South Africa reported contamination of its poultry carcasses by S. Hadar, S. Blockley, S. Irumu, and S. Anatum. Results from Egypt showed that S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium were predominant in poultry along with other non-typhoid strains, namely S. Infantis, S. Kentucky, S. Tsevie, S. Chiredzi, and S. Heidelberg. In Indonesia, the isolation of Salmonella Typhi was the main focus, while other serovars included S. Kentucky, S. Typhimurium, and S. Paratyhi C. In India, S. Bareilly was predominant compared to S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium, S. Paratyphi B, S. Cerro, S. Mbandaka, S. Molade, S. Kottbus, and S. Gallinarum. Romania reported two Salmonella serovars in poultry that affect humans, namely S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, and other non-typhoid strains including S. Infantis, S. Derby, S. Colindale, S. Rissen, S. Ruzizi, S. Virchow, S. Brandenburg, S. Bredeney, S. Muenchen, S. Kortrijk, and S. Calabar. The results showed the spread of different serovars of Salmonella in those five developing countries, which is alarming and emphasizes the urgent need for the World Health Organization Global Foodborne Infections Network (WHO-GFN) to expand its activities to include more strategic participation and partnership with most developing countries in order to protect poultry and humans from the serious health impact of salmonellosis.

Published
2015-01-15
How to Cite
1.
Barbour EK, Ayyash DB, Alturkistni W, Alyahiby A, Yaghmoor S, Iyer A, Yousef J, Kumosani T, Harakeh S (2015) Impact of sporadic reporting of poultry Salmonella serovars from selected developing countries. J Infect Dev Ctries 9:001-007. doi: 10.3855/jidc.5065
Section
Reviews

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