A rarely seen cause for empyema: Leuconostoc mesenteroıdes

  • Hanife Usta-Atmaca Internal Medicine Clinic Istanbul Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Feray Akbas Internal Medicine Clinic Istanbul Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Yesim Karagoz Radiology Clinic, Istanbul Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Mehmet Emin Piskinpasa Internal Medicine Clinic Istanbul Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
Keywords: Leuconostoc mesenteroides, pleural empyema, pickle

Abstract

Leuconostoc species are Gram-positive, non-motile, vancomycin-resistant bacteria placed within the family of Streptococcaceae. They naturally exist in food and are important in the sauerkraut, milk and wine industries due to their role in fermentation. Infections caused by Leuconostocs are generally reported in immunosuppressed patients with an underlying disease, or in those who were previously treated with vancomycin. Central venous catheter insertion is also a risk factor for introducing bacteria into the body. Although they are resistant to vancomycin, leuconostocs are sensitive to erythromycin and clindamycin. Here, we report a case with pleural empyema due to Leuconostoc mesenteroides in an otherwise healthy person whose occupation is known to be selling pickles.

Author Biographies

Hanife Usta-Atmaca, Internal Medicine Clinic Istanbul Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
Internal Medicine-MD, PhD
Feray Akbas, Internal Medicine Clinic Istanbul Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
Internal Medicine-MD, PhD
Yesim Karagoz, Radiology Clinic, Istanbul Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
Radiology-MD, PhD
Mehmet Emin Piskinpasa, Internal Medicine Clinic Istanbul Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
Internal Medicine-MD, PhD
Published
2015-04-15
How to Cite
1.
Usta-Atmaca H, Akbas F, Karagoz Y, Piskinpasa ME (2015) A rarely seen cause for empyema: Leuconostoc mesenteroıdes. J Infect Dev Ctries 9:425-427. doi: 10.3855/jidc.5237
Section
Case Reports