Presence of virulence genes and pathogenicity islands in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from Brazil

  • Paula Signolfi Cyoia Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
  • Gabriela Regina Rodrigues Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
  • Erick Kenji Nishio Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
  • Leonardo Pinto Medeiros Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
  • Vanessa Lumi Koga Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
  • Ana Paula Dier Pereira Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Clinical Analysis and Toxicological, University Hospital, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
  • Eliana Carolina Vespero Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Clinical Analysis and Toxicological, University Hospital, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
  • Sébastien Houle Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut Armand-Frappier (INRS), Laval, Quebec, Canada
  • Charles M Dozois Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut Armand-Frappier (INRS), Laval, Quebec, Canada
  • Gerson Nakazato Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
  • Renata K. T. Kobayashi Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Keywords: ExPEC, commensal Escherichia coli, virulence factors, PAI sequences, phylogenetic groups

Abstract

Introduction: Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is associated with various diseases such as urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis and septicemia. There are many virulence factors (VF) encoded by genes in ExPEC, including papC, papG, ecpA, iroN, fyuA, iutA, ompTp, tsh, hlyF, hlyA and iss. These virulence genes may be present in pathogenicity islands (PAI) or plasmids.

Methodology: In this study, we analyzed the presence of VF encoding genes, PAI sequences and phylogenetic groups of 96 ExPEC strains isolated from the urine and blood of patients at the University Hospital of Londrina, and we compared them with 50 faecal commensal strains from healthy individuals.

Results: The VF fyuA (65.60%) was detected in pathogenic strains and commensal strains (46%). A comparison of the distribution of ExPEC and commensal strains in the phylogenetic groups showed that more ExPEC strains belonged to group B2 whereas more of the commensal isolates belonged to group A. The distribution of the seven PAI sequences between commensal strains and ExPEC strains showed that PAI IV536 was common in both ExPEC and commensal isolates.

Conclusions: These results showed that the ExPEC strains that belonged to group B2 had more PAI sequences compared to those of the other groups, especially group B1, which had virulence genes but the lowest percentage of PAI sequences, which leads us to conclude that the virulence of ExPEC strains characterized as B2 is likely attributed to PAI encoded genes, whereas the virulence of ExPEC strains belonging to phylogenetic group B1 is likely due to plasmid encoded virulence genes.

Author Biographies

Paula Signolfi Cyoia, Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Doctorate student of Microbiology
Gabriela Regina Rodrigues, Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Pharmaceutical
Erick Kenji Nishio, Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Master Student of Microbiology
Leonardo Pinto Medeiros, Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Master Student of Microbiology
Vanessa Lumi Koga, Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Master Student of Microbiology
Ana Paula Dier Pereira, Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Clinical Analysis and Toxicological, University Hospital, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Pharmaceutical
Eliana Carolina Vespero, Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, Clinical Analysis and Toxicological, University Hospital, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
Professor in Clinical Microbiology
Sébastien Houle, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut Armand-Frappier (INRS), Laval, Quebec, Canada
Research
Charles M Dozois, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut Armand-Frappier (INRS), Laval, Quebec, Canada
Research Professor
Gerson Nakazato, Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil

Professor in Microbiology

Department of Microbiology

Biological Sciences Center

Renata K. T. Kobayashi, Biological Sciences Center, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil

Professor in Microbiology

Department of Microbiology

Biological Sciences Center

Published
2015-10-29
How to Cite
1.
Cyoia PS, Rodrigues GR, Nishio EK, Medeiros LP, Koga VL, Pereira APD, Vespero EC, Houle S, Dozois CM, Nakazato G, Kobayashi RKT (2015) Presence of virulence genes and pathogenicity islands in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from Brazil. J Infect Dev Ctries 9:1068-1075. doi: 10.3855/jidc.6683
Section
Original Articles