An outbreak of dermatophilosis and caseous lymphadenitis mixed infection in camels (Camelus dromedaries) in Jordan

  • Yaser Hamadeh Tarazi Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan
  • Falah Khalil Al-Ani College of Applied Sciences, A’Sharqiyah University, Oman
Keywords: Camelus dromedaries, dermatophilosis, caseous lymphadenitis, dermatitis, Jordan

Abstract

Introduction: This study describes and reports, for the first time, an outbreak of dermatophilosis that occurred concurrently with caseous lymphadenitis involving two camel herds (Camelus dromedaries) in north Jordan.

Methodology: The affected animals were part of two herds comprising 52 Arabian camels in herd 1 and 65 camels in herd 2. The age of infected camels ranged from 18 months to 5 years. Pus and skin scab samples were aseptically collected and bacteriologically examined. Affected camels were treated by long-acting oxytetracycline injection in a dose rate of 10 mg/kg body weight every 48 hours for three successive treatments, and local antiseptic and antibiotic cutaneous spray treatment for five successive days.

Results: The main clinical signs on affected camels were skin dermatitis and abscess formation. The isolated organisms were Dermatophilus congolensis and Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis were the causative agents of dermatophilosis and caseous lymphadenitis, respectively. Other organisms were isolated from skin abscesses, including α-hemolytic streptococci, hemolytic E. coli, Actinomyces pyogenes, and S. aureus. The affected camels were rapidly and effectively cured by the above-mentioned treatment protocol. No mortality was recorded.

Conclusions: Introducing purchased camels from animal auctions without pre-examination and keeping camels in over-crowded small barns under cold, humid, and rainy conditions during winter may predispose the eruption of mixed infection of dermatophilosis and caseous lymphadenitis. Treatment by long-acting oxytetracycline injection with local antiseptic and antibiotic cutaneous spray can control such infection. A survey on camel herds raised near Jordan’s borders is needed to monitor the possibility of emerging infectious disease.

Author Biographies

Yaser Hamadeh Tarazi, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan

Department of Basic Veterinary Medical Sciences

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

Associate professor of Microbiology

Falah Khalil Al-Ani, College of Applied Sciences, A’Sharqiyah University, Oman

Department of Veterinary Medical Clinical Sciences

Professor of veterinary Medicine

Published
2016-05-31
How to Cite
1.
Tarazi YH, Al-Ani FK (2016) An outbreak of dermatophilosis and caseous lymphadenitis mixed infection in camels (Camelus dromedaries) in Jordan. J Infect Dev Ctries 10:506-511. doi: 10.3855/jidc.7023
Section
Original Articles