Knowledge, attitudes, and practices about tuberculosis and choice of communication channels in Thailand

  • Supa Pengpid ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhonpathom, Thailand
  • Karl Peltzer ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhonpathom, Thailand
  • Apa Puckpinyo ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhonpathom, Thailand
  • Sariyamon Tiraphat ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhonpathom, Thailand
  • Somchai Viripiromgool ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhonpathom, Thailand
  • Tawatchai Apidechkul Faculty of Public Health, Mae Fah Luang University, Chiang Rai, Thailand
  • Chutarat Sathirapanya Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Thailand
  • Songkramchai Leethongdee Faculty of Public Health, Maha Sarakham University, Maha Sarakham, Thailand
  • Jiraporn Chompikul ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhonpathom, Thailand
  • Aroonsri Mongkolchati ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Mahidol University, Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhonpathom, Thailand
Keywords: tuberculosis, Thailand, knowledge, attitude and practice, sociodemographic determinants

Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess tuberculosis (TB) knowledge, attitudes, and practices in both the general population and risk groups in Thailand.

Methodology: In a cross-sectional survey, a general population (n = 3,074) and family members of a TB patient (n = 559) were randomly selected, using stratified multistage sampling, and interviewed.

Results: The average TB knowledge score was 5.7 (maximum = 10) in the Thai and 5.1 in the migrant and ethnic minorities general populations, 6.3 in Thais with a family member with TB, and 5.4 in migrants and ethnic minorities with a family member with TB. In multivariate linear regression among the Thai general population, higher education, higher income, and knowing a person from the community with TB were all significantly associated with level of TB knowledge. Across the different study populations, 18.6% indicated that they had undergone a TB screening test. Multivariate logistic regression found that older age, lower education, being a migrant or belonging to an ethnic minority group, residing in an area supported by the Global Fund, better TB knowledge, having a family member with TB, and knowing other people in the community with TB was associated having been screened for TB.

Conclusion: This study revealed deficiencies in the public health knowledge about TB, particularly among migrants and ethnic minorities in Thailand. Sociodemographic factors should be considered when designing communication strategies and TB prevention and control interventions.

Published
2016-08-02
How to Cite
1.
Pengpid S, Peltzer K, Puckpinyo A, Tiraphat S, Viripiromgool S, Apidechkul T, Sathirapanya C, Leethongdee S, Chompikul J, Mongkolchati A (2016) Knowledge, attitudes, and practices about tuberculosis and choice of communication channels in Thailand. J Infect Dev Ctries 10:694-703. doi: https://doi.org/10.3855/jidc.6963
Section
Original Articles