Pertussis in north-central and northwestern regions of Algeria

  • Nabila Benamrouche Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
  • Hassiba Tali Maamar Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
  • Malika Lazri Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
  • Sonia Hasnaoui Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
  • Abdelkarim Radoui Pediatric Specialized Hospital Establishment of Canastel, Oran, Algeria
  • Ourida Lafer Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
  • Rachida Boukari University Hospital Center of Blida, Blida, Algeria
  • Chawki Kaddache University Hospital Center of Blida, Blida, Algeria
  • Zakia Arrada University Hospital Center of Parnet, Algiers, Algeria
  • Kheira Rahal Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
Keywords: Algeria, pertussis, infants, contacts, real-time PCR, serology

Abstract

Introduction: Pertussis outbreaks continue to occur in many countries despite high vaccination coverage. Under-diagnosed cases in adolescents and adults may result in increased transmission to infants, who are at risk of severe pertussis. Additional measures to protect both groups should be considered.

Methodology: Nasopharyngeal samples and sera were collected from patients and household contacts with clinically suspected pertussis. Diagnoses were confirmed by culture, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and serology. Bordetella pertussis isolates were characterized by antimicrobial sensitivity and fimbrial serotyping.

Results: Of 392 participants, 134/248 patients (54%) and 66/144 contacts (45.8%) had confirmed pertussis infections. B. parapertussis was not detected. All B. pertussis isolates were sensitive to the antibiotics tested, and all expressed the Fim3, not the Fim2, fimbrial serotype. Most patients (81.2%) were <6 months (51.8% of whom were <3 months) of age; 77.6% were unvaccinated, and most positive contacts were mothers 20–40 years of age.

Conclusions: Despite high vaccination coverage, pertussis is circulating in Algeria. Most infections occur in unvaccinated infants <6 months of age, with mothers as the main source of infection. An adolescent/adult booster should be considered. Adoption of sensitive and specific laboratory tests would improve pertussis diagnosis and surveillance.

Author Biographies

Nabila Benamrouche, Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
Medical Bacteriology Laboratory
Hassiba Tali Maamar, Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
Medical Bacteriology Laboratory
Malika Lazri, Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
Medical Bacteriology Laboratory
Sonia Hasnaoui, Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
Medical Bacteriology Laboratory
Abdelkarim Radoui, Pediatric Specialized Hospital Establishment of Canastel, Oran, Algeria
Pediatric Pneumology Ward
Ourida Lafer, Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
Medical Bacteriology Laboratory
Rachida Boukari, University Hospital Center of Blida, Blida, Algeria
Pediatric Ward
Chawki Kaddache, University Hospital Center of Blida, Blida, Algeria
Pediatric Ward
Zakia Arrada, University Hospital Center of Parnet, Algiers, Algeria
Pediatric Ward
Kheira Rahal, Institut Pasteur of Algeria, Algiers, Algeria
Medical Bacteriology Laboratory
Published
2016-11-24
How to Cite
1.
Benamrouche N, Tali Maamar H, Lazri M, Hasnaoui S, Radoui A, Lafer O, Boukari R, Kaddache C, Arrada Z, Rahal K (2016) Pertussis in north-central and northwestern regions of Algeria. J Infect Dev Ctries 10:1191-1199. doi: 10.3855/jidc.7262
Section
Original Articles