The prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and their virulence genes in bulk tank milk in Kosovo

  • Ibrahim Mehmeti Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
  • Hysen Bytyqi Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, Prishtina, Kosovo
  • Skender Muji Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, Prishtina, Kosovo
  • Ingolf F Nes Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
  • Dzung B Diep Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
Keywords: milk quality, Listeria, Staphylococcus, enterotoxin, virulence

Abstract

Introduction: Milk is considered to be a healthy, nutritious food product. Microbiological quality is an important aspect in evaluating the quality of milk.

Methodology: A total of 603 bulk tank milk samples from 221 farms distributed across ten different regions were collected for milk quality assessment. Quality was judged by total viable count, and the prevalence of two foodborne pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) by using selective media and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The presence of virulence genes was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers.

Results: Milk from only 7% (15/221) of farms were found to comply with the European Union standard. Interestingly, the microbiological quality of milk from the larger herd size farms (more than 10 cows) was better than in smaller herds. L. monocytogenes was found in 2.7% (6/221) of farms, and all the examined L. monocytogenes isolates were positive with respect to the virulence genes prfA, actA, and hlyA. S. aureus was found in 39.8% (88/221) of the farms. In total, 30.7% (27/88) of the staphylococci were positive for enterotoxin production. The enterotoxins identified were toxin B (40.7%), toxin D (33.4%), toxin C (18.5%), and toxin A (7.4%).

Conclusions: The total number of bacteria in milk was very high. The presence of two foodborne pathogens in raw milk represents a great health risk to consumers. To improve the microbial quality of milk in Kosovo, important measures to improve hygiene, including better information, guidance, and control, are needed.

Author Biographies

Ibrahim Mehmeti, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences
Hysen Bytyqi, Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, Prishtina, Kosovo
Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary
Skender Muji, Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, Prishtina, Kosovo
Faculty of Agriculture and Veterinary
Ingolf F Nes, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences
Dzung B Diep, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway
Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Biosciences
Published
2017-03-31
How to Cite
1.
Mehmeti I, Bytyqi H, Muji S, Nes I, Diep D (2017) The prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and their virulence genes in bulk tank milk in Kosovo. J Infect Dev Ctries 11:247-254. doi: https://doi.org/10.3855/jidc.8256
Section
Original Articles