Detection of carbapenemase-producing bacteria in a public healthcare center from Venezuela

  • Liliana Gomez-Gamboa School of Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1354-1095
  • Armindo Perozo-Mena School of Bioanalysis, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0378-7860
  • Jose Bermudez-Gonzalez Bios Venezuela, CA Maracaibo, Venezuela
  • Christty Villavicencio School of Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela
  • Jessica Villasmil School of Bioanalysis, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela
  • Messaria M Ginestre School of Bioanalysis, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela
  • Jesvy Velasquez School of Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela
Keywords: carbapenemase-producing bacteria, KPC, VIM

Abstract

Introduction: The dramatic increase in the prevalence and clinical impact of infections caused by Carbapenemase-Producing Bacteria in the nosocomial setting in Latin America represents an emerging challenge to public health. The present study detected carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria in patients from a Hospital from Venezuela, by phenotypic and genotypic methods.

Methodology: The bacterial identification was carried out using conventional methods. The resistance to carbapenems was performed by Kirby-Baüer disk diffusion method, according to CLSI recommendations. The modified Hodge Test, double-disk with phenylboronic acid, double-disk with EDTA and Blue Carba Test were performed to detect phenotypic carbapenemase producers. The carbapenemase-encoding genes blaKPC, blaVIM, blaIMP, blaOXA-2, blaOXA-3, blaOXA-15 and blaOXA-21 were determined.

Results: The bacterial species identified were Klebsiella pneumoniae complex (181), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (51), and Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex (119). KPC-type was detected in 40.17% of isolates and VIM-type in 14.53%. KPC-type gene was only identified in K. pneumoniae isolates (77.9%). VIM-type gene was identified in P. aeruginosa (86.27%) and K. pneumoniae isolates (3.87%). There was not detection of IMP-type and OXA-type genes.

Conclusions: We found a predominance of K. pneumoniae KPC producers and a high rate of VIM-producing P. aeruginosa. The epidemiology of CPB in Venezuela is rapidly evolving, and enhanced surveillance and reporting are needed across the healthcare continuum.

Author Biographies

Liliana Gomez-Gamboa, School of Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Microbiology Chair. School of Medicine. Medical Faculty. University of Zulia. Maracaibo. Venezuela

Armindo Perozo-Mena, School of Bioanalysis, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Bacteriology Professional Practice. School of Bioanalysis. Medical Faculty. University of Zulia. Maracaibo. Venezuela

Jose Bermudez-Gonzalez, Bios Venezuela, CA Maracaibo, Venezuela

BIOS Venezuela C.A. Director

Christty Villavicencio, School of Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Microbiology Chair. School of Medicine. Medical Faculty. University of Zulia. Maracaibo. Venezuela.

Jessica Villasmil, School of Bioanalysis, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Hematology Chair. School of Bioanalysis. Medical Faculty. University of Zulia. Venezuela.

Messaria M Ginestre, School of Bioanalysis, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Bacteriology Professional Practice. School of Bioanalysis. Medical Faculty. University of Zulia. Venezuela.

 

Jesvy Velasquez, School of Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Zulia, Maracaibo, Venezuela

Microbiology Chair. School of Medicine. Medical Faculty. University of Zulia. Maracaibo. Venezuela

Published
2020-12-27
How to Cite
1.
Gomez-Gamboa L, Perozo-Mena A, Bermudez-Gonzalez J, Villavicencio C, Villasmil J, Ginestre MM, Velasquez J (2020) Detection of carbapenemase-producing bacteria in a public healthcare center from Venezuela. J Infect Dev Ctries 15:163-167. doi: 10.3855/jidc.13567
Section
Brief Original Articles