Malaria prevention practices and malaria prevalence among children living in a rural community in Southwest Nigeria

  • Odunayo Adebukola Temitope Fatunla Department of Paediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Afe Babalola University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
  • Oladele Simeon Olatunya Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
  • Ezra Olatunde Ogundare Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
  • Tolulope Oladapo Fatunla Department of Family Medicine, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
  • Adefunke Olarinre Babatola Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
  • Adewuyi Temidayo Adeniyi Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
  • Oyeku Akibu Oyelami Department of Paediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria
Keywords: Malaria, prevalence, prevention, nets, antimalarial, herbs

Abstract

Introduction: Living conditions in most rural African communities favour malaria transmission and threaten global eradication. Prevention strategies and interventions such as the use of bed nets have reduced the prevalence of malaria. This study described the various methods employed to prevent malaria and their effects on malaria parasite prevalence among children living in a rural community in Nigeria.

Methodology: A community-based cross-sectional study conducted among 357 children aged 1–15 years, in a Nigerian rural community. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 25. Chi-squared test of association with a level of significance of p < 0.050 was used.

Results: Only 110 (30.8%) participants owned mosquito nets. Mostly those from the high social class (45; 40.9%) used the nets, and these were mostly ‘under-five’ children. Thirty-six (10.1%) were routinely given antimalarial drugs for malaria prophylaxis. Also, 102 (28.6%), 151 (42.3%), 278 (77.9%), 99 (27.7%) and 15 (5.0%) children used insecticides, local herbs, window nets, outlet door nets and mosquito repellent creams respectively. None of the methods employed to prevent malaria had statistically significant effect on malaria parasite prevalence among participants (p > 0.050).

Conclusions: Malaria prevention methods were mostly practiced by participants of the high social class while children under-five considerably used mosquito nets. This study highlights the need to address the socio-demographic imbalance regarding malaria preventive measures in the community where the study was conducted. There is also a need to regulate the use of antimalarial drugs for malaria prophylaxis in the rural community. These suggest that the current malaria prevention methods in the community be reviewed.

Published
2022-02-28
How to Cite
1.
Fatunla OAT, Olatunya OS, Ogundare EO, Fatunla TO, Babatola AO, Adeniyi AT, Oyelami OA (2022) Malaria prevention practices and malaria prevalence among children living in a rural community in Southwest Nigeria. J Infect Dev Ctries 16:352-361. doi: 10.3855/jidc.14894
Section
Original Articles