Infection prevention and control awareness, attitudes, and practices among healthcare professionals in South India

  • Suhas K. Thazha Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, MIMS College of Allied Health Sciences, ASTER MIMS Academy, Kerala University of Health Sciences, India
  • Jonas Preposi Cruz Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Nazarbayev University, Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan
  • Nahed Alquwez Nursing Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Shaqra University, Saudi Arabia
  • Bibin Scaria Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, AKG Institute of Health Sciences, Kerala University of Health Sciences, India
  • Sameesh S. Rengan Vocational Higher Secondary Education, Kerala, India
  • Joseph U. Almazan Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Nazarbayev University, Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan
Keywords: Healthcare, infection, medical laboratory technologist, nurses, prevention

Abstract

Introduction: Infection is a key challenge in healthcare settings around the world. Healthcare professionals (HCPs), including medical laboratory technologists (MLTs) and nurses, are at risk of infection because they are in close contact with infected patients. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the awareness, attitude, and practices of Infection Prevention Control (IPC) among HCPs working in private tertiary hospitals in two states in South India.

Methodology: This quantitative study surveyed 571 HCPs in southern India. In September 2021, an online survey was used to collect data on the respondents’ demographic and IPC-related variables, as well as their awareness, attitudes, and practices of IPC.

Results: The survey revealed high level of awareness, positive attitudes, and good IPC practices. Among the IPC practices, “changing gloves between contacts with different patients” was the most often practiced and “washing hands after removal of gloves” was the least practiced. Being a nurse, being older, finishing a graduate program, attending a risk assessment training, having sufficient Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) at work, and being aware of the safety guidelines were associated with better awareness. Being a nurse, being older, and holding a diploma were associated with more positive attitudes. Being MLT, attending risk assessment training, having sufficient PPE at work, and being aware of the safety guidelines were associated with better IPC practices.

Conclusions: Measures to sustain the high awareness, positive attitudes, and good IPC practices by dealing with the factors associated with these variables identified in this study must be planned and implemented.

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Author Biographies

Suhas K. Thazha, Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, MIMS College of Allied Health Sciences, ASTER MIMS Academy, Kerala University of Health Sciences, India

Lecturer, Clinical Laboratory Science Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences

Nahed Alquwez, Nursing Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Shaqra University, Saudi Arabia

Assistant Professor and Dean, College of Applied Medical Sciences at Dawadmi

Bibin Scaria, Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, AKG Institute of Health Sciences, Kerala University of Health Sciences, India

Lecturer, Clinical Laboratory Science Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences at Shaqra

Joseph U. Almazan, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Nazarbayev University, Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan

Assistant Professor, College of Medicine

Published
2022-04-30
How to Cite
1.
Thazha SK, Cruz JP, Alquwez N, Scaria B, Rengan SS, Almazan JU (2022) Infection prevention and control awareness, attitudes, and practices among healthcare professionals in South India. J Infect Dev Ctries 16:659-667. doi: 10.3855/jidc.14746
Section
Original Articles