Radiology imaging equipment and accessories as possible fomites of nosocomial pathogens

  • Isaac Agyekum Adomako Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT), Medical Imaging and Therapeutic Sciences; Cape Town, South Africa
  • Dalene Venter CPUT, Medical Imaging and Therapeutic Sciences Cape Town, South Africa
  • Eric Sampane-Donkor University of Ghana, Department of Microbiology, Korle Bu, Ghana
  • Penelope Engel-Hills CPUT, Medical Imaging and Therapeutic Sciences Cape Town, South Africa
Keywords: radiographer, fomites, infection control, nosocomial infections, cleaning, equipment

Abstract

Introduction: Radiology is a technical service that provides medical imaging for all sectors of healthcare. Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) is a major challenge in radiology and this is exacerbated in contexts where the healthcare system is unable to provide adequate funding and attention to effective infection control measures. The objectives of this study were to audit current cleaning procedures through the observation of practices in a radiology department, and to determine the types and numbers of nosocomial pathogens present on selected radiology imaging equipment and accessories before and after decontamination.

Methodology: In phase one we observed seven radiographers to audit cleaning procedures and practices. In phase two we collected swab samples from selected radiology imaging equipment and accessories and then cultured them for identification of microbes.

Results: It was observed that radiographers partially practiced infection control measures. This was due to the absence of documented protocol for infection control procedures. Our results indicated that all the selected equipment and accessories were contaminated with microorganisms pre- and post-cleaning. The identified microbes were Staphylococcus aureus, Coagulase negative Staphylococci (CoNS), Bacillus species (spp.), Shigella spp., Shigella sonnei., Klebsiella spp., Salmonella paratyphi A (S. paratyphi A), Salmonella typhi (S. typhi), Providencia rettgeri, Enterobacter spp. and Citrobacter spp. and Methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

Conclusions: The research concluded that the recommended cleaning agents did not effectively reduce the number of microorganisms making the selected equipment and accessories fomites for nosocomial pathogens.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Dalene Venter, CPUT, Medical Imaging and Therapeutic Sciences Cape Town, South Africa

Retired Academic CPUT, Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences

Eric Sampane-Donkor, University of Ghana, Department of Microbiology, Korle Bu, Ghana

Professor Eric Sampane-Donkor

BSc-Hons, MPhil (Ghana) | MBA (KNUST) | MSc, PhD, DLSHTM (London) | PhD (Iceland)
Head, Department of Medical Microbiology
University of Ghana Medical School
P. O. Box 4236
Accra, GHANA.

Penelope Engel-Hills, CPUT, Medical Imaging and Therapeutic Sciences Cape Town, South Africa

Penelope Engel-Hills

Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town CPUT Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences.

Published
2022-07-28
How to Cite
1.
Adomako IA, Venter D, Sampane DonkorE, Engel-HillsP (2022) Radiology imaging equipment and accessories as possible fomites of nosocomial pathogens. J Infect Dev Ctries 16:1174-1184. doi: 10.3855/jidc.14225
Section
Original Articles