Biliary fascioliasis – A rare differential diagnosis of biliary obstruction

  • Phuong Anh Ton Nu Department of Parasitology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Hue University, Hue, Vietnam
  • Thi Minh Chau Ngo Department of Parasitology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Hue University, Hue, Vietnam
  • Vinh Nguyen Phuoc Department of Parasitology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Hue University, Hue, Vietnam
  • Thanh Dang Nhu Department of Abdominal Surgery, Hue Central Hospital, Hue, Vietnam
  • Anh Do Ngoc Department of Parasitology, Vietnam Military Medical University, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • Le Chi Cao Department of Parasitology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Hue University, Hue, Vietnam https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7817-4479
Keywords: Fasciola, fascioliasis, biliary tract diseases

Abstract

Fascioliasis is a zoonotic disease caused by Fasciola hepatica or F. gigantica. There are two phases of Fasciola infection. In the acute phase, the patient has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations while the later phase of infection is usually related to inflammatory changes in the bile duct and the mechanical effects of the worm, which can lead to biliary obstruction. The presence of Fasciola inside the biliary system has rarely been reported in the literature. In this report, we presented a case of bile duct obstruction in a 36-year-old male patient undergoing cholecystectomy for gallstones and with a history of worsening jaundice for one month. Extensive laboratory testing failed to clarify the cause of jaundice. Three living liver flukes were subsequently retrieved from the right hepatic duct and later confirmed as F. gigantica by morphology and internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) sequence analysis.

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Published
2022-10-31
How to Cite
1.
Ton NuPA, Ngo TMC, Nguyen PhuocV, Dang NhuT, Do NgocA, Cao LC (2022) Biliary fascioliasis – A rare differential diagnosis of biliary obstruction. J Infect Dev Ctries 16:1664-1667. doi: 10.3855/jidc.16037
Section
Case Reports