Ochrobactrum anthropi: An emerging pathogen causing meningitis with sepsis in a neurotrauma patient

Meningitis and sepsis by O. anthropi

  • Neha Rastogi JPNA Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Purva Mathur JPNA Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Abstract

Ochrobactrum anthropi is an unusual emerging pathogen especially in the hospital environment.  Most of the reported cases are nosocomially acquired infections in patients with various indwelling and invasive medical devices, such as central venous catheters and drainage tubes. We report a case of nosocomially transmitted invasive catheter related septicaemia with meningitis due to O. anthropi, in an elderly immunocompetent male with a head trauma admitted to a level -1 trauma centre. This report describes clinical and microbiological characteristics of rare pathogen and also highlights the importance of rapid identification, susceptibility testing of such opportunistic pathogens in trauma settings and its unique antibiotic susceptibility profiles. This requires prompt treatment with timely intervention, and appropriate antimicrobial therapy, alongside adherence to strict infection control practices.

Author Biographies

Neha Rastogi, JPNA Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Senior Resident,Department of Laboratory Medicine,JPNA Trauma Centre,AIIMS, New Delhi, India, 110029

Purva Mathur, JPNA Trauma Centre, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Associate Professor

Department of Laboratory Medicine

Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre,

All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, 110029, India

Published
2017-10-07
How to Cite
Rastogi N, Mathur P (2017) Ochrobactrum anthropi: An emerging pathogen causing meningitis with sepsis in a neurotrauma patient. The Journal Of Infection In Developing Countries 11 (09): 733-735. https://doi.org/10.3855/jidc.9146
Section
Case Reports

Keywords

Ochrobactrum anthropi, emerging, pathogen, nosocomial.