Analysis of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) mutations in patients from Western Saudi Arabia with chronic disease

  • Sherif Aly El-Kafrawy King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Ghazi Abdulatif Jamjoom King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Hisham Othman Akbar King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Hind Ibrahim Baker Fallatah King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Mai Mohamed El-Daly King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Yousef Abdulfattah Qari King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Abdullah Saeed Alghamdi King Fahad Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Mohamed Babatin King Fahad Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Mohammed Abdullah Alsaedi King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Noura Abdulhamid Othman King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Tagreed Lafi Al-Subhi King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  • Mohamed Abdel-Hamid National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institute, Cairo, Egypt
  • Esam Ibraheem Azhar King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Keywords: HBV, HBV variants, chronic HBV, sequencing, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Introduction: Extensive research has provided a link between HBV variants and the clinical complications of liver diseases. This study was performed to further investigate the relationship between HBV variants in preS, S and BCP/PC regions and disease progression in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) cases in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Methodology: 182 CHB patients were recruited for this study. HBV DNA was amplified by PCR in the PreS, S, and BCP/PC regions. Sequences were generated from 31 and 26 treated cases in PreS and S regions respectively and from 72 cases in the BCP/PC region.

Results: The majority of cases (86.7%) were genotype D. Mutations at preS1-A2922C, X-A1624C and PC-G1887A were detected only in cases with either a high fibrosis score or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), while mutations at positions PC-C1982A, PC-G1951T, X-C1628T and X-A1630G were detected more frequently in HCC cases, without reaching statistical significance. Seven deletions were detected in the PreS-region. No deletions were detected in the CCAAT box.

The accumulation of mutations per sample in the preS1-2 and S regions were associated with elevated ALT (p < 0.001, 0.001 and 0.001; respectively) and increased fibrosis (p = 0.018, 0.02 and 0.013; respectively). The accumulation of mutations per sample in the BCP/PC region is associated with high viral load. Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) was identified in 5 samples.

Conclusion: Our results add to the knowledge about HBV genotype-D variants. The accumulation of mutations per sample and OBI seem to play a role in the progression of HBV infection. G1896A was associated with the HBeAg negativity. The preS deletions did not play a role in liver disease progression.

Author Biographies

Sherif Aly El-Kafrawy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Special Infectious Agents Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center

Ghazi Abdulatif Jamjoom, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Special Infectious Agent Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center

Hisham Othman Akbar, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine

Hind Ibrahim Baker Fallatah, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Unit of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine

Mai Mohamed El-Daly, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Special Infectious Agent Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center

Yousef Abdulfattah Qari, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Department of Medicine

Abdullah Saeed Alghamdi, King Fahad Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Gastroenterology unit

Mohamed Babatin, King Fahad Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Department of Medicine

Mohammed Abdullah Alsaedi, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Special Infectious Agent Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center

Noura Abdulhamid Othman, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Special Infectious Agent Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center

Tagreed Lafi Al-Subhi, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Special Infectious Agent Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center

Mohamed Abdel-Hamid, National Hepatology and Tropical Medicine Research Institute, Cairo, Egypt

Viral Hepatitis Research Laboratory

Esam Ibraheem Azhar, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Special Infectious Agent Unit, King Fahd Medical Research Center

Published
2018-07-31
How to Cite
1.
El-Kafrawy SA, Jamjoom GA, Akbar HO, Fallatah HIB, El-Daly MM, Qari YA, Alghamdi AS, Babatin M, Alsaedi MA, Othman NA, Al-Subhi TL, Abdel-Hamid M, Azhar EI (2018) Analysis of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) mutations in patients from Western Saudi Arabia with chronic disease. J Infect Dev Ctries 12:557-567. doi: 10.3855/jidc.9534
Section
Original Articles