Cost effectiveness of dressing in the prevention of catheter-related infection in critically ill patients

  • Edivane Pedrolo Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil
  • Mitzy Tannia Reichembach Danski Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil
  • Astrid Wiens Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil
  • Radamés Boostel Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil
Keywords: catheter-related infections, catheterization, central venous, costs and cost-analysis, evidence-based practice, nursing

Abstract

Introduction: Catheter-related infection is a complication of high morbimortality. The aim was to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of gauze and medical tape, transparent semi–permeable and chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings for short-term central venous catheter, within the Brazilian Public Healthcare System (Sistema Único de Saúde – SUS) scenario.

Methodology: a decision tree was elaborated in order to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of dressings in the prevention of catheter-related infection in critically ill patients. The outcome was the probability of catheter-related infections prevention. Moreover, only direct medical expenses were considered. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the model uncertainties.

Results: Chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing presented higher cost-effectiveness when the base case was analyzed (cost of US$ 655 per case prevented, 99% of effectiveness), in comparison to gauze and medical tape dressing (US$ 696, effectiveness of 96%). Dressing changes performed before the recommended period, treatment performed exclusively in inpatient units and high effectiveness of gauze and medical tape dressing were variables that interfered with the results. The probability of death has also demonstrated to have a major impact on cost-effectiveness.

Conclusion: In the context of a Brazilian public hospital, the chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing presented higher cost-effectiveness when compared to the gauze and medical tape dressing or the transparent semi-permeable dressing.

Published
2018-10-31
How to Cite
1.
Pedrolo E, Danski M, Wiens A, Boostel R (2018) Cost effectiveness of dressing in the prevention of catheter-related infection in critically ill patients. J Infect Dev Ctries 12:871-877. doi: https://doi.org/10.3855/jidc.10269
Section
Original Articles