Serum levels of soluble CD163 and soluble CD14 following antibiotic therapy of patients with acute brucellosis

  • Huali Sun Centre for Infectious Disease, Beijing Di Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  • Rongmeng Jiang Centre for Infectious Disease, Beijing Di Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  • Bing Han Centre for Infectious Disease, Beijing Di Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  • Xiufang Du Department of Infectious Disease, the Third People’s Hospital, Linfen City, Shanxi Province, China
  • Chengjie Ma The Laboratory of lnfectious Diseases Centre, Beijing Di Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  • Yanli Xu Centre for Infectious Disease, Beijing Di Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  • Zhihai Chen Centre for Infectious Disease, Beijing Di Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  • Linghang Wang The Laboratory of lnfectious Diseases Centre, Beijing Di Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  • Siyuan Yang The Laboratory of lnfectious Diseases Centre, Beijing Di Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
  • Xiao Lv Department of Laboratory Medicine, the Third People’s Hospital, Linfen City, Shanxi Province, China
  • Hong Zhao Department of Laboratory Medicine, the Third People’s Hospital, Linfen City, Shanxi Province, China
  • Xingwang Li Centre for Infectious Disease, Beijing Di Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
Keywords: biomarker, sCD14, sCD163, Brucellosis

Abstract

Introduction: Soluble CD163 (sCD163) and soluble CD14 (sCD14) levels, monocyte/macrophage activation markers, are elevated in patient serum during Brucella infection. The aim of this study was to measure serum sCD163 and sCD14 levels during treatment for acute brucellosis to determine whether they can be used to monitor treatment efficacy.

Methodology: Blood samples were collected from 30 patients with acute brucellosis (disease duration < 8 weeks) before and after 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy as well as from a comparison group of 28 healthy control individuals. Serum sCD163 and sCD14 levels were measured with specific, sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The clinical data and routine indices including C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR), as well as white cell counts (WBC) were also studied.

Results: Both serum sCD163 and sCD14 levels were significantly higher in patients with acute brucellosis than in healthy controls (p < 0.0001). A significant decline was observed in patients after cessation of treatment (p < 0.001), which still be significantly higher than that in healthy controls (p < 0.001). In additional, serum sCD163 levels were positively correlated with sCD14 levels; both of which were positively associated with CRP levels. However, neither sCD163 nor sCD14 levels were correlated with ESR or WBC.

Conclusions: The decline in sCD163 and sCD14 levels following antibiotic therapy may be used as a marker to assess therapeutic efficacy following treatment of acute brucellosis.

Published
2019-08-31
How to Cite
1.
Sun H, Jiang R, Han B, Du X, Ma C, Xu Y, Chen Z, Wang L, Yang S, Lv X, Zhao H, Li X (2019) Serum levels of soluble CD163 and soluble CD14 following antibiotic therapy of patients with acute brucellosis. J Infect Dev Ctries 13:714-719. doi: 10.3855/jidc.10602
Section
Original Articles