High rate of neonates colonized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species in an Intensive Care Unit

  • Vivian Carolina Salgueiro Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Milena D’Angelo Lima Seixas Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Lorrayne Cardoso Guimarães Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Dennis de Carvalho Ferreira Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Estácio de Sá, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Denise Cotrim da Cunha Maternidade Leila Diniz, Hospital Municipal Lourenço Jorge, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Simone Aranha Nouér Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Kátia Regina Netto dos Santos Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Keywords: colonization, neonates,, multiresistance,, clonal diversity,, clinical aspects, Staphylococcus species

Abstract

Introduction: Staphylococcal colonization is a risk factor for healthcare-associated infections, which are frequent in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). This study analyzed microbiology, epidemiology and clinical aspects of Staphylococcus spp. colonizing neonates.

Methodology: Nasal or periumbilical swabs were evaluated from 175 newborns admitted to a NICU of a Rio de Janeiro hospital from March to September 2009. Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. SCCmec typing and the mecA and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) genes were detected by PCR. Clonal diversity was evaluated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

Results: Staphylococcus spp. isolates were detected in 98 (56%) neonates, 66.3% of them had birth weight ≤ 2500 g, 62.2% were preterm (˂ 37 weeks) and the mean length of hospitalization was 14.9 days. Among the 133 isolates identified, 48.1% were S. epidermidis, 23.3% S. haemolyticus and 13.5% S. aureus. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus isolate was detected in 77.6% of neonates. The methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates carried the SCCmec type IV, while 94.6% of S. epidermidis and 85.7% of S. haemolyticus presented non-typeable cassettes. Among the S. aureus, 55.6% had PVL genes and the USA800 genotype was prevalent. Two genotypes of S. epidermidis and one of S. haemolyticus clustered 42.2% and 25.8% of the isolates, respectively. S haemolyticus colonization was associated with the use of parenteral nutrition and mechanical ventilation.

Conclusion: High rate of neonates colonized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species and the permanence of clones circulating in the NICU highlight the importance for continuous and preventive surveillance in this high-risk population.

Published
2019-09-30
How to Cite
1.
Salgueiro VC, Seixas MDL, Guimarães LC, Ferreira D de C, da Cunha DC, Nouér SA, dos Santos KRN (2019) High rate of neonates colonized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus species in an Intensive Care Unit. J Infect Dev Ctries 13:810-816. doi: 10.3855/jidc.11241
Section
Original Articles