Evaluation of “Cyscope”, a novel fluorescence-based microscopy technique for the detection of malaria

  • Lovemore Gwanzura Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Harare, Zimbabwe
  • Justin Mayini Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Harare, Zimbabwe
  • Katherine Mabhanga National Institute of Health Research, Harare
  • Joseph Chipinduro National Institute of Health Research, Harare
  • Kansomba Mashamba National Institute of Health Research, Harare
  • Menard Mutenherwa Partec GmbH, Munster, Germany
  • Susan L Mutambu National Institute of Health Research, Harare
  • Junior Mutsvangwa Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Harare, Zimbabwe
  • Peter Robert Mason Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Harare, Zimbabwe
Keywords: malaria, fluorescence-based microscopy technique, diagnosis, resource-limited settings

Abstract

Introduction: This study was designed to compare the detection of malaria parasites in peripheral blood smears using the Cyscope malaria rapid fluorescent microscopic technique and light microscopy of Giemsa-stained smears.

Methodology: A total of 295 blood smears were collected from patients of all age groups presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of malaria to 10 City Health Clinics in Harare.  For each patient two blood films were prepared. Microscopic examination was done independently in two laboratories, with one performing the Giemsa stain and the other the Cyscope method.  After the tests were completed, the results were then matched and recorded without any alterations.

Results: An equal number of men and women were malaria positive and their ages ranged from five to 66 years. Concordance in the detection of parasites (positive or negative) was 98.6% (291/295).  In all four cases of discordance, malaria parasites were detected using the Cyscope but not with conventional microscopy. The Cyscope gave a 100% sensitivity and a specificity of 98.6%. 

Conclusion: The Cyscope may be a valuable addition to diagnostics of malaria  in  resource-limited settings such as Zimbabwe.

Author Biographies

Lovemore Gwanzura, Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Harare, Zimbabwe

Director  of laboratories  - BRTI.

Professor  - In the Department of Medical Laboratory Sceinces, University of Zimbabwe

Justin Mayini, Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Harare, Zimbabwe
laboratory scientist at  BRTI
Katherine Mabhanga, National Institute of Health Research, Harare
Senior laboratory scientist
Joseph Chipinduro, National Institute of Health Research, Harare
Laboratory scientist
Kansomba Mashamba, National Institute of Health Research, Harare
Laboratory Scientist
Menard Mutenherwa, Partec GmbH, Munster, Germany

Partec Sales Manager

Susan L Mutambu, National Institute of Health Research, Harare
Director of NIHR
Junior Mutsvangwa, Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Harare, Zimbabwe
Head of Laboratories - BRTI
Peter Robert Mason, Biomedical Research and Training Institute, Harare, Zimbabwe

Director General - BRTI

Professor - in Dept of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Zimbabwe

Published
2011-11-30
How to Cite
1.
Gwanzura L, Mayini J, Mabhanga K, Chipinduro J, Mashamba K, Mutenherwa M, Mutambu S, Mutsvangwa J, Mason P (2011) Evaluation of “Cyscope”, a novel fluorescence-based microscopy technique for the detection of malaria. J Infect Dev Ctries 6:212-215. doi: https://doi.org/10.3855/jidc.2054
Section
Technical Notes