Outcome of Tuberculosis patients under directly observed short course treatment in western Ethiopia

  • Eyasu Ejeta College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
  • Muda Chala College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
  • Gebeyaw Arega College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
  • Kassahu Ayalsew College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
  • Lensa Tesfaye College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
  • Tadesse Birhanu College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
  • Haimanot Disassa College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
Keywords: treatment outcome, tuberculosis, DOTS, western Ethiopia

Abstract

Introduction: Treatment outcome is an important indicator of tuberculosis control programs, as suggested by the World Health Organization. However, this has not been well documented in the study area. This work contributes to a better understanding this issue.

Methodology: A five-year (2009–2013) retrospective cohort study was conducted between April and May 2014, in six randomly selected health institutions providing tuberculosis treatment in western Ethiopia. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between treatment outcomes and predictor variables.

Results: A total of 1,175 tuberculosis patients with a mean (standard deviation) age of 29.91 (13.99) were involved in the study. The majority of the study participants had smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (39.7%) and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (39.7%). Of all the study participants, 14.5% were cured, 56.3% completed treatment, 0.2% had treatment failure, 8.1% died during follow-up, 7.1% were reported as defaulters, and 13.8% were transferred out to another health institution. The overall treatment success rate was 70.8% and show progressive increases over the course of the study. The associated predictors were enrollment years, HIV co-infection, and sputum smear follow-up in the second, fifth, and seven months.

Conclusions: The treatment success rate was unsatisfactory in spite of improvement seen over the study period. Thus, continued follow-up of patients, with frequent supportive supervision during the course of treatment, and provision of early detection and follow-up for HIV infection need to be strengthened to achieve an effective treatment outcome.

Author Biographies

Eyasu Ejeta, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
Assistant professor of Tropical and Infectious Disease, Departement of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
Muda Chala, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
Departement of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Medical and Health Sciences
Gebeyaw Arega, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
Departement of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Medical and Health Sciences
Kassahu Ayalsew, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
Departement of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Medical and Health Sciences
Lensa Tesfaye, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
Departement of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Medical and Health Sciences
Tadesse Birhanu, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical and Health Sciences
Haimanot Disassa, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Wollega University, Nekemte, Ethiopia
School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Medical and Health Sciences
Published
2015-07-30
How to Cite
1.
Ejeta E, Chala M, Arega G, Ayalsew K, Tesfaye L, Birhanu T, Disassa H (2015) Outcome of Tuberculosis patients under directly observed short course treatment in western Ethiopia. J Infect Dev Ctries 9:752-759. doi: 10.3855/jidc.5963
Section
Original Articles