Self-perceived knowledge level of epidemic management in medical residents prior to the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico

  • Jesus Reyna-Figueroa Teaching and Research Department, Central South Hospital, Mexican Petroleum, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Ivan Arvizu-Chavez Occupational Health Service, Central South Hospital, Mexican Petroleum, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Eva Maria Luna-Rivera Teaching and Research Department, Central South Hospital, Mexican Petroleum, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Veronica Gonzalez-Olivo Teaching and Research Department, Regional Hospital of Salamanca, Petroleos Mexicanos, Guanajuato, Mexico
  • Carla Contreras-Ochoa Infectious Disease Research Center, Public Health Institute. Cuernavaca, Morelos, México
  • Eric Alfonso Amador-Rodriguez Occupational Health Service, Central South Hospital, Mexican Petroleum, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Cesar Alejandro Arce-Salinas Internal Medicine Department, Central South Hospital, Mexican Petroleum, Mexico City, Mexico
Keywords: Emergency health services, pandemic, medical residency, COVID-19

Abstract

Introduction: COVID-19 was declared a pandemic in March 2020, requiring a comprehensive response from all healthcare systems, including Mexico’s. As medical residents’ training did not involve epidemic response, we decided to evaluate their level of training on this subject, specifically self-perceived knowledge level and capacity to respond to epidemiological crises.

Methodology: Medical residents from two hospitals belonging to PEMEX (Mexico’s state-owned petroleum company) were included in a cross-sectional study. All participants answered a modified version of the survey developed by the University of Lovaina’s Center for Research and Education in Emergency Care. Participants were analyzed according to their relevant “clinical” or “surgical” residency tracks. Data were analyzed using through Chi-square tests, t-tests, Mann–Whitney U tests, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients with significance established at p < 0.05.

Results: Of a total of 94 resident participants in this study, 56.7% self-perceived themselves as being poorly prepared to confront the pandemic. Only 25.5% of the participants referred previous experience in medical responses to public health emergencies, and only 35.1% reported ever receiving education on this topic.

Conclusions: Medical residents—who have been involved with caring for victims of the pandemic—are under the general perception that they are not prepared, experienced, or educated enough to respond to such a widespread massive public health emergency.

Author Biography

Jesus Reyna-Figueroa, Teaching and Research Department, Central South Hospital, Mexican Petroleum, Mexico City, Mexico

Pediatric Infectious diseases, Department of pediatrics.

Published
2021-11-30
How to Cite
1.
Reyna-Figueroa J, Arvizu-Chavez I, Luna-Rivera EM, Gonzalez-Olivo V, Contreras-Ochoa C, Amador-Rodriguez EA, Arce-Salinas CA (2021) Self-perceived knowledge level of epidemic management in medical residents prior to the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico. J Infect Dev Ctries 15:1597-1602. doi: 10.3855/jidc.13401
Section
Coronavirus Pandemic