A suitable blood agar containing human blood especially for the use in laboratories of developing countries

  • Nils Niederstebruch Globolab e.V. Laboratory, Assling, Germany
  • Doris Sixt Globolab e.V. Laboratory, Assling, Germany
  • Benard Isah Benda Saint Joseph´s Hospital St. John of God Laboratory, Monrovia, Liberia
  • Nestor Banboye Hospital St. John of God Laboratory, Lunsar-Mabesseneh, Sierra Leone
Keywords: blood agar, developing countries, human blood, bacteria isolation, hemolysis, antibiograms

Abstract

Introduction: In developed countries, blood agar containing defibrinated sheep or horse blood is a standard tool for the isolation of bacteria from clinical samples. Several issues prevent blood agar containing animal blood from being used in many developing countries. However, the use of easily available human blood for blood agar is discouraged because of the common tenet that human blood in nutrient media results in poor bacterial isolation rates and hardly visible hemolysis or no hemolysis at all. We have developed a reconfigured and easily applicable composition for blood agar containing human blood and tested its usability with respect to hemolysis visibility and its characteristics in antibiograms with Streptococcus spp.

Methodology: Hemolysis tests were conducted with clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus mitis. In a second test series, clinical strains of Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus mitis were tested with Mueller-Hinton agars containing defibrinated wether blood as well as with Mueller-Hinton agars containing citrated human blood to compare the results of antibiotic susceptibility testing.

Results: The reconfigured blood agars containing 2.5% citrated human blood showed almost identical reactions to the standard blood agars used in the developed world.

Conclusions: For the first time, blood agars containing 2.5% citrated human blood were shown to be an acceptable alternative for the isolation of the above-mentioned bacteria as well as for use in antibiotic susceptibility testing.

Author Biographies

Nils Niederstebruch, Globolab e.V. Laboratory, Assling, Germany

Chairman and Head of Microbiological Training

Doris Sixt, Globolab e.V. Laboratory, Assling, Germany

Deputy Head of Microbiological Training

Benard Isah Benda, Saint Joseph´s Hospital St. John of God Laboratory, Monrovia, Liberia

Head of Laboratory, Saint Joseph´s Hospital St. John of God Laboratory, Monrovia, Liberia

Nestor Banboye, Hospital St. John of God Laboratory, Lunsar-Mabesseneh, Sierra Leone

Head of Laboratory, Hospital St. John of God Laboratory, Lunsar-Mabesseneh, Sierra Leone

Published
2017-06-01
How to Cite
1.
Niederstebruch N, Sixt D, Benda BI, Banboye N (2017) A suitable blood agar containing human blood especially for the use in laboratories of developing countries. J Infect Dev Ctries 11:399-406. doi: 10.3855/jidc.8957
Section
Original Articles