Seroprevalence of transfusion transmissible infections among blood donors by chemiluminescent assay in a tertiary care centre

  • Raja Sundaramoorthy Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India
  • Ramesh Arunagiri Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India
  • Vithiya Ganesan Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India
  • Sethuammal Perumal Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India
  • Rajendran Tiruvanamalai Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India
  • Jhansi Charles Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India
Keywords: TTIs, Seroprevalence, Blood DOnors, Chemiuluminescent assay

Abstract

Introduction: Blood transfusion is a life saving measure, but also carries risk of transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs). In spite of improved donor screening, risk of transmission of TTIs still remains a major concern. Stringent screening of blood not only ensures safe supply of blood and blood products, but also gives us an idea about prevalence of TTIs among general population.

Methodology: Blood donors (voluntary and replacement), fulfilling national and regional blood bank criteria, attended our blood bank, during Jan 2015-Dec 2016 (included). Retrospective data analysis was performed by a structured database. After obtaining informed consent, venous blood was collected and analysed for HBsAg, anti-HCV and Anti-HIV1&2 (Chemiluminescent assay -OrthoVitrosECi/ECiQ), Malaria (ICT–pf/pan-Alere) and Syphilis (RPR-Labcare Dignotics).

Results: A total of 9027 donors were screened; Males and females were 99.23% and 0.76% respectively with the mean age of 27.4 ± 2years (19-58years). Voluntary donors were 68.7%; replacement donors 31.3%. Voluntary donation increased by 3% in 2016 (69.7%) vs 2015 (67.1%). TTI prevalence was 1.12% (102/9027). Surprisingly prevalence was higher among voluntary donors, females and 21-30 years. Seroprevalence of HBV (0.42%), HIV (0.13%), and Malaria (0.01%), in our region was relatively inferior than other parts of country. Nonetheless, HCV (0.56%) infections were on the rise. No syphilis case was reported. Low seropositivity rate is believed to be attributed to improved counselling of blood donors, adherence to standard donor selection criteria and rational use of blood.

Conclusion: Even though low prevalence, effective control strategies including stringent screening, implementation of more sensitive tests and health education are urgently needed to prevent those TTIs.

Author Biographies

Ramesh Arunagiri, Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India

MD Microbiology

Vithiya Ganesan, Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India

MD Microbiology

Sethuammal Perumal, Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India

MD Microbiology

Rajendran Tiruvanamalai, Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India

MD Microbiology

Jhansi Charles, Velammal Medical College Hospital and Research Institute, Madurai, India

MD Microbiology

Published
2018-01-31
Section
Original Articles