Antimicrobial resistance, virulence genes and molecular subtypes of S. Enteritidis isolated from children in Shanghai

  • Li Xu Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
  • Xiujuan Zhou Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
  • Xuebin Xu Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China
  • Karl R Matthews Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, United States
  • Yue Liu Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
  • Dai Kuang Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  • Xianming Shi Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
Keywords: S. enteridis, antimicrobial resistance, virulence gene, PFGE, childhood infections

Abstract

Introduction: Antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella poses a key threat to public health worldwide. Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) (119 isolates) from children under 10 years old with diarrhea in Shanghai from 2010-2012 were characterized for antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence gene profiles and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns.

Methodology: The minimum inhibitory concentration for the 119 S. Enteritidis isolates was determined using an agar dilution method. The presence of virulence genes was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All the isolates with antimicrobial resistance were subjected to PFGE analysis.

Results: Among these isolates, 71.4% (85) were resistant to sulfafurazole, 59.7% (71) were resistant to ampicillin, 47.1% (56) were resistant to streptomycin, 7.6% (9) were resistant to ceftiofur and 3.4% (4) were resistant to ceftriaxone. Multidrug resistance (MDR) was found in 63.9% (76) of the isolates; 23 resistance profiles were identified. All isolates harbored the ssaQ and sopE virulence genes in the 16 virulence profiles (VPs); VP1 accounted for 70.59% of the 119 isolates. There were 57 PFGE patterns among the 92 isolates tested, mainly grouped into five clusters (A to E). All of the 76 MDR isolates carried multiple virulence genes.

Conclusions: Our study provides useful microbiological data for the successful treatment of S. Enteritidis infections in Shanghai. Although broad spectrum antimicrobials may be useful in the treatment of invasive S. Enteritidis infections, clinicians need to be aware of common microbiological traits, because of the high prevalence of MDR.

Author Biographies

Li Xu, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China

MOST-USDA Joint Research Center for Food Safety, School of Agriculture & Biology, and State Key Lab of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Xiujuan Zhou, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China

MOST-USDA Joint Research Center for Food Safety, School of Agriculture & Biology, and State Key Lab of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Xuebin Xu, Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, China

Department of Microbiology

Karl R Matthews, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, United States

Department of Food Science

Yue Liu, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China

MOST-USDA Joint Research Center for Food Safety, School of Agriculture & Biology, and State Key Lab of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Dai Kuang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

MOST-USDA Joint Research Center for Food Safety, School of Agriculture & Biology, and State Key Lab of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Xianming Shi, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China

MOST-USDA Joint Research Center for Food Safety, School of Agriculture & Biology, and State Key Lab of Microbial Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Published
2018-07-31
How to Cite
1.
Xu L, Zhou X, Xu X, Matthews KR, Liu Y, Kuang D, Shi X (2018) Antimicrobial resistance, virulence genes and molecular subtypes of S. Enteritidis isolated from children in Shanghai. J Infect Dev Ctries 12:573-580. doi: 10.3855/jidc.9733
Section
Original Articles